The Emerald City of Oz

by

L. Frank Baum

Free Public Domain E-Books from the
Classic Literature Library

The Emerald City of Oz Page 01

The Emerald City of Oz

by L. Frank Baum

Author of The Road to Oz,
Dorothy and The Wizard in Oz,
The Land of Oz, etc.

Contents

--Author's Note--
1. How the Nome King Became Angry
2. How Uncle Henry Got Into Trouble
3. How Ozma Granted Dorothy's Request
4. How The Nome King Planned Revenge
5. How Dorothy Became a Princess
6. How Guph Visited the Whimsies
7. How Aunt Em Conquered the Lion
8. How the Grand Gallipoot Joined The Nomes
9. How the Wogglebug Taught Athletics
10. How the Cuttenclips Lived
11. How the General Met the First and Foremost
12. How they Matched the Fuddles
13. How the General Talked to the King
14. How the Wizard Practiced Sorcery
15. How Dorothy Happened to Get Lost
16. How Dorothy Visited Utensia
17. How They Came to Bunbury
18. How Ozma Looked into the Magic Picture
19. How Bunnybury Welcomed the Strangers
20. How Dorothy Lunched With a King
21. How the King Changed His Mind
22. How the Wizard Found Dorothy
23. How They Encountered the Flutterbudgets
24. How the Tin Woodman Told the Sad News
25. How the Scarecrow Displayed His Wisdom
26. How Ozma Refused to Fight for Her Kingdom
27. How the Fierce Warriors Invaded Oz
28. How They Drank at the Forbidden Fountain
29. How Glinda Worked a Magic Spell
30. How the Story of Oz Came to an End

Author's Note

Perhaps I should admit on the title page that this book is "By L. Frank Baum and his correspondents," for I have used many suggestions conveyed to me in letters from children. Once on a time I really imagined myself "an author of fairy tales," but now I am merely an editor or private secretary for a host of youngsters whose ideas I am requestsed to weave into the thread of my stories.

These ideas are often clever. They are also logical and interesting. So I have used them whenever I could find an opportunity, and it is but just that I acknowledge my indebtedness to my little friends.

My, what imaginations these children have developed! Sometimes I am fairly astounded by their daring and genius. There will be no lack of fairy-tale authors in the future, I am sure. My readers have told me what to do with Dorothy, and Aunt Em and Uncle Henry, and I have obeyed their mandates. They have also given me a variety of subjects to write about in the future: enough, in fact, to keep me busy for some time. I am very proud of this alliance. Children love these stories because children have helped to create them. My readers know what they want and realize that I try to please them. The result is very satisfactory to the publishers, to me, and (I am quite sure) to the children.

I hope, my dears, it will be a long time before we are obliged to dissolve partnership.

L. FRANK BAUM.

Coronado, 1910

1. How the Nome King Became Angry

The Nome King was in an angry mood, and at such times he was very disagreeable. Every one kept away from him, even his Chief Steward Kaliko.

Therefore the King stormed and raved all by himself, walking up and down in his jewel-studded cavern and getting angrier all the time. Then he remembered that it was no fun being angry unless he had some one to frighten and make miserable, and he rushed to his big gong and made it clatter as loud as he could.

In came the Chief Steward, trying not to show the Nome King how frightened he was.

"Send the Chief Counselor here!" shouted the angry monarch.

Kaliko ran out as fast as his spindle legs could carry his fat, round body, and soon the Chief Counselor entered the cavern. The King scowled and said to him:

"I'm in great trouble over the loss of my Magic Belt. Every little while I want to do something magical, and find I can't because the Belt is gone. That makes me angry, and when I'm angry I can't have a good time. Now, what do you advise?"

"Some people," said the Chief Counselor, "enjoy getting angry."

"But not all the time," declared the King.

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